UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Protective factors associated with short-term cessation of injection drug use among a Canadian cohort of people who inject drugs

Luchenski, S; Ti, L; Hayashi, K; Dong, H; Wood, E; Kerr, T; (2016) Protective factors associated with short-term cessation of injection drug use among a Canadian cohort of people who inject drugs. Drug and Alcohol Review , 35 (5) pp. 620-627. 10.1111/dar.12364. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Protective Factors.pdf - Published version

Download (268kB) | Preview

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Strategies are needed to transition persons who inject drugs out of injecting. We undertook this study to identify protective factors associated with cessation of injection drug use. DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were derived from three prospective cohorts of people who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada, between September 2005 and November 2011. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine protective factors and 6‐month cessation of injection drug use. RESULTS: Our sample of 1663 people who inject drugs included 563 (33.9%) women, and median age was 40 years. Overall, 904 (54.4%) individuals had at least one 6‐month injection cessation event. In multivariable analysis, protective factors associated with cessation of injection drug use included the following: having a regular place to stay [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13–1.48]; formal employment (AOR = 1.12; 95% CI 1.01–1.23); social support from personal contacts (AOR = 1.22; 95% CI 1.10–1.35); social support from professionals (AOR = 1.26; 95% CI 1.14–1.39); ability to access health and social services (AOR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.09–1.34); and positive self‐rated health (AOR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.11–1.32). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Over half of people who inject drugs in this study reported achieving 6‐month cessation of injection drug use, with cessation being associated with a range of modifiable protective factors. Policy makers and practitioners should promote increased access to stable housing, employment, social support and other services to promote cessation of injection drug use. [Luchenski S, Ti L, Hayashi K, Dong H, Wood E, Kerr T. Protective factors associated with short‐term cessation of injection drug use among a Canadian cohort of people who inject drugs Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:620–627]

Type: Article
Title: Protective factors associated with short-term cessation of injection drug use among a Canadian cohort of people who inject drugs
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/dar.12364
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/dar.12364
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & technology, life sciences & biomedicine, substance abuse, intravenous drug abuse, protective factors, drug-seeking behaviour, health services accessibility, social determinants of health, intervention, predictors, employment, baltimore, patterns, relapse, homelessness, behavior, youth, risk
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10050252
Downloads since deposit
42Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item