UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Co-Processed Excipients for Dispersible Tablets—Part 2: Patient Acceptability

Dziemidowicz, K; Lopez, FL; Bowles, BJ; Edwards, AJ; Ernest, TB; Orlu, M; Tuleu, C; (2018) Co-Processed Excipients for Dispersible Tablets—Part 2: Patient Acceptability. AAPS PharmSciTech , 19 (6) pp. 2646-2657. 10.1208/s12249-018-1104-2. Green open access

[thumbnail of Dziemidowicz 2018_Article_Co-ProcessedExcipientsForDispe.pdf]
Preview
Text
Dziemidowicz 2018_Article_Co-ProcessedExcipientsForDispe.pdf - Published Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Palatability and patient acceptability are critical attributes of dispersible tablet formulation. Co-processed excipients could provide improved organoleptic profile due to rational choice of excipients and manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to identify the most suitable co-processed excipient to use within directly compressible dispersible tablet formulations. Nine excipients, selected based on successful manufacturability, were investigated in a randomised, preference and acceptability testing in 24 healthy adult volunteers. Excipients were classified in order of preference as follows (from most preferred): SmartEx QD100 > F-Melt Type C > F-Melt Type M > MicroceLac > Ludiflash > CombiLac > Pharmaburst 500 > Avicel HFE-102 > Avicel PH-102. Broad differences were identified in terms of acceptability, with SmartEx QD100 being ‘very acceptable’, F-Melt Type C, F-Melt Type M and MicroceLac being ‘acceptable’, Ludiflash, CombiLac and Pharmaburst 500 being ‘neutral’ and Avicel products being ‘very unacceptable’ based on ratings using 5-point hedonic scales. Organoleptic differences were ascribed to different composition and physical properties of excipients, resulting in dissimilar taste and mouth-feel. Excipients with particle size in water larger than 200-250 µm were considered poorly acceptable, which supports the use of this value as a threshold for maximum particle size of dispersible formulation. The most promising co-processed excipients for directly compressible dispersible tablets were successfully identified.

Type: Article
Title: Co-Processed Excipients for Dispersible Tablets—Part 2: Patient Acceptability
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1208/s12249-018-1104-2
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1208/s12249-018-1104-2
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Co-processed excipients; dispersible tablets; taste; palatability; patient acceptability.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharma and Bio Chemistry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10050176
Downloads since deposit
183Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item