UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Genomic epidemiology of Shigella in the United Kingdom shows transmission of pathogen sublineages and determinants of antimicrobial resistance

Baker, KS; Dallman, TJ; Field, N; Childs, T; Mitchell, H; Day, M; Weill, F-X; ... Thomson, N; + view all (2018) Genomic epidemiology of Shigella in the United Kingdom shows transmission of pathogen sublineages and determinants of antimicrobial resistance. Science Reports , 8 (1) , Article 7389. 10.1038/s41598-018-25764-3. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Genomic epidemiology of Shigella in the United Kingdom shows transmission of pathogen sublineages and determinants of antimicrobial resistance.pdf - Published version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Shigella are globally important diarrhoeal pathogens that are endemic in low-to-middle income nations and also occur in high income nations, typically in travellers or community-based risk-groups. Shigella phylogenetics reveals population structures that are more reliable than those built with traditional typing methods, and has identified sublineages associated with specific geographical regions or patient groups. Genomic analyses reveal temporal increases in Shigella antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene content, which is frequently encoded on mobile genetic elements. Here, we whole genome sequenced representative subsamples of S. flexneri 2a and S. sonnei (n = 366) from the United Kingdom from 2008 to 2014, and analysed these alongside publicly available data to make qualitative insights on the genomic epidemiology of shigellosis and its AMR within the broader global context. Combined phylogenetic, epidemiological and genomic anlayses revealed the presence of domestically-circulating sublineages in patient risk-groups and the importation of travel-related sublineages from both Africa and Asia, including ciprofloxacin-resistant sublineages of both species from Asia. Genomic analyses revealed common AMR determinants among travel-related and domestically-acquired isolates, and the evolution of mutations associated with reduced quinolone susceptibility in domestically-circulating sublineages. Collectively, this study provides unprecedented insights on the contribution and mobility of endemic and travel-imported sublineages and AMR determinants responsible for disease in a high-income nation.

Type: Article
Title: Genomic epidemiology of Shigella in the United Kingdom shows transmission of pathogen sublineages and determinants of antimicrobial resistance
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-25764-3
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25764-3
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Bacterial genetics, Clinical microbiology, Molecular medicine
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10049421
Downloads since deposit
39Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item