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High‐precision voluntary movements are largely independent of preceding vertex potentials elicited by sudden sensory events

Kilintari, M; Bufacchi, RJ; Novembre, G; Guo, Y; Haggard, P; Iannetti, GD; (2018) High‐precision voluntary movements are largely independent of preceding vertex potentials elicited by sudden sensory events. Journal of Physiology , 596 (16) pp. 3655-3673. 10.1113/JP275715. Green open access

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Abstract

Salient and fast‐rising sensory events generate a large biphasic vertex wave (VW) in the human electroencephalogram (EEG). We recently reported that the VW is coupled with a modulation of concomitantly‐applied isometric force. In the present study, in five experiments, we tested whether the VW is also related to high‐precision visuomotor control. We obtained three results. First, the saliency‐induced increase in VW amplitude was paralleled by a modulation in two of the five extracted movement parameters: a reduction in the onset time of the voluntary movement (P < 0.005) and an increase in movement accuracy (P < 0.005). Second, spontaneous trial‐by‐trial variability in vertex wave amplitude, for a given level of stimulus saliency, was positively correlated with movement onset time (P < 0.001 in four out of five experiments). Third, this latter trial‐by‐trial correlation was explained by a widespread EEG negativity independent of the occurrence of the positive VW, although overlapping in time with it. These results indicate that (i) the execution of a voluntary high‐precision movement remains relatively independent of the neural processing reflected by the preceding VW, with (ii) the exception of movement onset time, for which saliency‐based contextual effects are dissociated from trial‐by‐trial effects. These results also indicate that (iii) attentional effects can produce spurious correlations between event‐related potentials (ERPs) and behavioural measures. Although sudden salient stimuli trigger characteristic EEG responses coupled with distinct reactive components within an ongoing isometric task, the results of the present study indicate that the execution of a subsequent voluntary movement appears largely protected from such saliency‐based modulation, with the exception of movement onset time.

Type: Article
Title: High‐precision voluntary movements are largely independent of preceding vertex potentials elicited by sudden sensory events
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1113/JP275715
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1113/JP275715
Language: English
Additional information: © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: saliency, vertex potential, event‐related potentials, voluntary movement, motor control
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10049288
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