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Comparison of indoor temperatures of homes with recommended temperatures and effects of disability and age: an observational, cross-sectional study

Huebner, GM; Hamilton, I; Chalabi, Z; Shipworth, D; Oreszczyn, T; (2018) Comparison of indoor temperatures of homes with recommended temperatures and effects of disability and age: an observational, cross-sectional study. BMJ Open , 8 (5) , Article e021085. 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021085. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examine if temperatures in winter in English homes meet the recommendation of being at least 18°C at all times. We analyse how many days meet this criterion and calculate the hours per day and night being at/above 18°C. These metrics are compared between households with occupants aged above 64 years or having a long-term disability (LTD) and those younger and without disability. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, observational. SETTING: England. PARTICIPANTS: 635 households. OUTCOMES MEASURES: (1) Mean temperatures, (2) proportion of days of the measurement period meeting the criterion, (3) average hours at/above 18°C, (4) average hours at night at/above 18°C. RESULTS: Mean winter temperatures in the bedroom were MBR=18.15°C (SD=2.51), the living room MLR=18.90°C (SD=2.46) and the hallway MHall=18.25°C (SD=2.57).The median number of days meeting the criterion was 19-31%. For the living room, more days meet the criterion in the group with a LTD (Mdisability=342 vs Mno_disability=301, 95% CI 8 to 74), and with someone over 64 years present (Mabove64=341, Mbelow65=301 95%, CI 8 to 74).The median number of hours/day meeting the criterion was 13-17. In the living room, households with a disability had more hours at 18°C (Mdisability=364, Mno_disability=297, 95% CI 17 to 83) as did the older age group (Mabove64=347, Mbelow65=296, 95% CI 18 to 84). In the hallway, more hours met the criterion in households with a disability (Mdisability=338, Mno_disability=302, 95% CI 3 to 70).247 homes had at least nine hours of at least 18°C at night; no effect of age or disability. CONCLUSIONS: Many households are at risk of negative health outcomes because of temperatures below recommendations.

Type: Article
Title: Comparison of indoor temperatures of homes with recommended temperatures and effects of disability and age: an observational, cross-sectional study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021085
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021085
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Adverse events, epidemiology, health policy, public health
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10049229
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