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Volcan de Colima dome collapse of July, 2015 and associated pyroclastic density currents

Reyes-Davila, GA; Arambula-Mendoza, R; Espinasa-Perena, R; Pankhurst, MJ; Navarro-Ochoa, C; Savov, I; Vargas-Bracamontes, DM; ... Lee, PD; + view all (2016) Volcan de Colima dome collapse of July, 2015 and associated pyroclastic density currents. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research , 320 pp. 100-106. 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2016.04.015. Green open access

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Abstract

During July 10th–11th 2015, Volcán de Colima, Mexico, underwent its most intense eruptive phase since its Subplinian–Plinian 1913 AD eruption. Production of scoria coincident with elevated fumarolic activity and SO2 flux indicate a significant switch of upper-conduit dynamics compared with the preceding decades of dome building and vulcanian explosions. A marked increase in rockfall events and degassing activity was observed on the 8th and 9th of July. On the 10th at 20:16 h (Local time = UTM − 6 h) a partial collapse of the dome generated a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) that lasted 52 min and reached 9.1 km to the south of the volcano. The PDCs were mostly channelized by the Montegrande and San Antonio ravines, and produced a deposit with an estimated volume of 2.4 × 106 m3. Nearly 16 h after the first collapse, a second and larger collapse occurred which lasted 1 h 47 min. This second collapse produced a series of PDCs along the same ravines, reaching a distance of 10.3 km. The total volume calculated for the PDCs of the second event is 8.0 × 106 m3. Including associated ashfall deposits, the two episodes produced a total of 14.2 × 106 m3 of fragmentary material. The collapses formed an amphitheater-shaped crater open towards the south. We propose that the dome collapse was triggered by arrival of gas-rich magma to the upper conduit, which then boiled-over and sustained the PDCs. A juvenile scoria sample selected from the second partial dome collapse contains hornblende, yet at an order of magnitude less abundant (0.2%) than that of 1913, and exhibits reaction rims, whereas the 1913 hornblende is unreacted. At present there is no compelling petrologic evidence for imminent end-cycle activity observed at Volcán de Colima.

Type: Article
Title: Volcan de Colima dome collapse of July, 2015 and associated pyroclastic density currents
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2016.04.015
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2016.04.015
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Monitoring, Volcán de Colima, Petrology, Lava dome collapse, Boiling-over, Pyroclastic density currents
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10049162
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