UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Investigation of possible risk factors for depression in Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review of the evidence

Steck, N; Cooper, C; Orgeta, V; (2018) Investigation of possible risk factors for depression in Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review of the evidence. Journal of Affective Disorders , 236 pp. 149-156. 10.1016/j.jad.2018.04.034. Green open access

[thumbnail of Orgeta_Revised Submission Risk factors for depression in AD 06 03 2018.pdf]
Preview
Text
Orgeta_Revised Submission Risk factors for depression in AD 06 03 2018.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (552kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Depression is common in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is associated with increased risk of institutionalization and mortality. Understanding risk factors for depression in AD is key to its development and treatment. / Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAL databases for longitudinal prospective cohort studies that evaluated risk factors for depression in people with AD. Two authors independently selected articles for inclusion and assessed quality of studies using predetermined criteria. / Results: In seven studies that met the inclusion criteria, 2029 participants were followed up for a median of 5 years. Gender and educational attainment were not predictors of depression risk. History of a past psychiatric disorder and greater cognitive impairment predicted increased risk of depression in more than one study. In single studies, younger age, having a family history of psychiatric disorder, neuroticism, functional decline, presence of sleep disturbance and aggression, and increased cardiovascular risk predicted depression risk. Not being within 6 months of dementia onset and, counterintuitively having two comorbid disorders were protective factors in one study. / Limitations: A small number of studies exist overall and only a few have examined the same risk factors. Most of the studies have measured depression using scales that are not validated in AD. / Conclusions: These results inform a preliminary model of depression risk in people with AD. Unlike in the general population, men and women and those with higher and lower educational levels of attainment may be equally at risk of depression. Clinicians should be aware of these possible differences in the risk profile for depression in AD populations, to assist detection and enable early treatment. Interventions to delay cognitive and functional decline may reduce depression risk.

Type: Article
Title: Investigation of possible risk factors for depression in Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review of the evidence
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2018.04.034
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.04.034
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Depression, Depressive symptoms, Risk factors, Protective factors, Vulnerability, Affective symptoms, Affective disorders
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10048960
Downloads since deposit
379Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item