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IL1RN Variation Influences both Disease Susceptibility and Response to Human Recombinant IL-1RA Therapy in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Arthur, VL; Shuldiner, E; Remmers, EF; Hinks, A; Grom, AA; Foell, D; Martini, A; ... Ombrello, MJ; + view all (2018) IL1RN Variation Influences both Disease Susceptibility and Response to Human Recombinant IL-1RA Therapy in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Arthritis & Rheumatology , 70 (8) pp. 1319-1330. 10.1002/art.40498. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) susceptibility loci identified by candidate gene studies demonstrated association with sJIA in the largest study population assembled to date. METHODS: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 11 previously reported sJIA risk loci were examined for association in 9 populations, including 770 sJIA cases and 6947 control subjects. The effect of sJIA-associated SNPs on gene expression was evaluated in silico in paired whole genome and RNA sequencing data from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) of 373 European 1000 Genomes Project subjects. The relationship between sJIA-associated SNPs and response to anakinra treatment was evaluated in 38 US patients for whom treatment response data were available. RESULTS: We found no association of the 26 SNPs previously reported as sJIA-associated. Expanded analysis of the regions containing the 26 SNPs revealed only one significant association, the promoter region of IL1RN (p<1E-4). sJIA-associated SNPs correlated with IL1RN expression in LCLs, with an inverse correlation between sJIA risk and IL1RN expression. The presence of homozygous IL1RN high expression alleles correlated strongly with non-response to anakinra therapy (OR 28.7 [3.2, 255.8]). CONCLUSION: IL1RN was the only candidate locus associated with sJIA in our study. The implicated SNPs are among the strongest known determinants of IL1RN and IL1RA levels, linking low expression with increased sJIA risk. Homozygous high expression alleles predicted non-response to anakinra therapy, nominating them as candidate biomarkers to guide sJIA treatment. This is an important first step towards the personalized treatment of sJIA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: IL1RN Variation Influences both Disease Susceptibility and Response to Human Recombinant IL-1RA Therapy in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/art.40498
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1002/art.40498
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: IL1RN, anakinra, biomarker, genetics, personalized medicine, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10046138
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