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Advances in green leases and green leasing: evidence from Sweden, Australia, and the UK

Janda, KB; Rotmann, S; Bulut, M; Lenannder, S; (2017) Advances in green leases and green leasing: evidence from Sweden, Australia, and the UK. In: ECEEE 2017 Summer Study proceedings. (pp. pp. 349-358). European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE) Green open access

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Abstract

Improving the environmental performance of non-domestic buildings is a complex problem due to the participation of multiple stakeholders. This is particularly challenging in tenanted spaces, where landlord and tenant interactions are regulated through leases that traditionally ignore environmental considerations. ‘Green leasing’ has been conceptualized as a form of ‘middle-out’ inter-organisational environmental governance that operates between organisations, alongside other drivers. Green leases form a valuable framework for tenant–landlord cooperation within properties and across portfolios. This paper offers a comparative international investigation of how leases are evolving to become ‘greener’ in Sweden, Australia, and the UK, drawing on experience from an IEA project on behaviour change and a UK project on energy strategy development. It considers how stakeholder retrofit opportunities and interactions in non-domestic buildings are shaped by the (1) policy context in each country (e.g., the EPBD, NABERS, and MEES) and (2) prevailing leasing practices in each country. Based on this analysis, the paper develops a new market segmentation framework to accentuate the different roles that public sector organisations and private property companies play as both tenants and landlords across countries. We suggest that national government policies assist the public sector in leading on better leasing practices, whereas international certification and benchmarking schemes (e.g., BREEAM & GRESB) may provide more fuel to private sector tenants and landlords. The paper concludes with a discussion of the fit between property portfolios and policies, suggesting that international green lease standards might assist multinational tenants and property owners in upgrading both their premises and their operational practices.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: Advances in green leases and green leasing: evidence from Sweden, Australia, and the UK
Event: eceee 2017 Summer Study - Consumption, efficiency & limits
Location: Belambra Les Criques, Toulon/Hyères, France
Dates: 29 May 2017 - 03 June 2017
ISBN: 9789198387810
ISBN-13: 9789198387803
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: https://www.eceee.org/library/conference_proceedin...
Language: English
Additional information: © eceee and the authors 2017. This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Tenants, landlords, non-domestic, minimum energy efficiency standards, Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD)
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10045415
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