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Ethnicity and sexual risk in heterosexual people attending sexual health clinics in England: a crosssectional, self-administered questionnaire study

Sherr, L; Coyle, RM; Miltz, AR; Lampe, FC; Sewell, J; Phillips, AN; Speakman, A; ... A U R A H Study Group; + view all (2018) Ethnicity and sexual risk in heterosexual people attending sexual health clinics in England: a crosssectional, self-administered questionnaire study. Sexually Transmitted Infections , 94 (5) pp. 384-391. 10.1136/sextrans-2017-053308. Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: To determine how ethnic background influences early sexual activity among young adults. Methods: Quantitative data were collected during the Research with East London Adolescents Community Health Survey study, a population-based survey of young adults belonging to white and black and minority ethnic groups and residing in east London in 2001 (n = 2,689) and 2003 (n = 2,675). Qualitative data were obtained from 146 young adults between January and September 2003. Results: Black Caribbean, black African, white other, and mixed ethnicity young men were most likely to report high-risk sexual behaviors, that is, sexual debut at the age of ≤13 years, having unprotected sex, and having multiple sexual partners. There were marked variations within groups commonly collapsed as “black” or as “Muslim.” Black Caribbean and black African young adults reported high rates of protective behaviors in addition to risk behaviors. Qualitative data confirmed variations in sexual behavior within ethnic groups. Longitudinally, risk of engaging in two or more high-risk sexual behaviors was predicted by low family support (OR: 2.8, 95% CI: 1.6–4.9), regular smoking (OR: 4.5, 95% CI: 1.7–12.0), and usage of illicit drugs (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.5–5.8), with lower risk predicted by low peer support (OR: .3, 95% CI: .2–.6). Conclusions: Young adults belonging to black and minority ethnic groups reported a wide variation in sexual risk behaviors. High levels of high-risk behaviors were reported in ethnic groups known to have high rates of sexually transmitted infections. Effective sexual health interventions should be started early and they must focus on sexual debut and partner choices as well as messages regarding safe sex.

Type: Article
Title: Ethnicity and sexual risk in heterosexual people attending sexual health clinics in England: a crosssectional, self-administered questionnaire study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/sextrans-2017-053308
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2017-053308
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright information © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Sexual behavior, Adolescent, Black and minority ethnicity, Epidemiology, Teenage pregnancy
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10045295
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