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Association of 10-year C-reactive protein trajectories with markers of healthy aging: findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Lassale, C; Batty, GD; Steptoe, A; Cadar, D; Akbaraly, TN; Kivimäki, M; Zaninotto, P; (2019) Association of 10-year C-reactive protein trajectories with markers of healthy aging: findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Journals of Gerontology: Series A , 74 (2) pp. 195-203. 10.1093/gerona/gly028. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Elevated systematic inflammation is a hallmark of aging, but the association of long-term inflammation trajectories with subsequent aging phenotypes has been little examined. We assessed inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) repeatedly over time and examined whether long-term changes predicted aging outcomes. METHODS: A total of 2,437 men and women aged 47-87 years at baseline (1998-2001) who were participants in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing had CRP measured on two or three occasions between 1998 and 2009. Inflammation trajectories were computed using latent-class growth mixture modelling and were related to aging outcomes measured in 2012/2013: physical functioning, cardiometabolic, respiratory, mental health, and a composite “healthy aging” outcome. RESULTS: Four CRP trajectories were identified: ‘stable-low’ (71% of the sample) with baseline mean 1.33mg/L remaining <3mg/L; ‘medium-to-high’ (14%) with baseline 2.7mg/L rising to 5.3mg/L; ‘high-to-medium’ (10%) with baseline 6.6mg/L decreasing to 2.4mg/L; ‘stable-high’ (5%) with levels from 5.7 to 7.5mg/L. Relative to the stable-low trajectory, individuals in the medium-to-high had a higher risk of limitations in basic activities of daily living (ADL, Odds Ratio; 95% Confidence Interval: 2.09; 1.51,2.88), instrumental ADL (1.62; 1.15,2.30), impaired balance (1.59; 1.20,2.11) and walking speed (1.61; 1.15,2.24), arthritis (1.55; 1.16,2.06), hypertension (1.57; 1.21,2.04), obesity (1.95; 1.36,2.80), poor respiratory function (1.84; 1.36,2.50), and depression (1.55; 1.13,2.12). A lower odds of healthy aging was observed in people in the medium-to-high (0.57; 0.40,0.79) and stable-high (0.50; 0.27,0.91) trajectories. CONCLUSIONS: Older people who displayed an elevation in CRP levels over a decade experienced an increased risk of adverse aging outcomes.

Type: Article
Title: Association of 10-year C-reactive protein trajectories with markers of healthy aging: findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/gerona/gly028
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gly028
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Inflammation, Successful aging, Cardiovascular, Physical function, Mental health
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10044557
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