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Use of Electroencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Systems as a Rehabilitative Approach for Upper Limb Function After a Stroke: A Systematic Review

Monge-Pereira, E; Ibanez-Pereda, J; Alguacil-Diego, IM; Serrano, JI; Spottorno-Rubio, MP; Molina-Rueda, F; (2017) Use of Electroencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Systems as a Rehabilitative Approach for Upper Limb Function After a Stroke: A Systematic Review. PM&R , 9 (9) pp. 918-932. 10.1016/j.pmrj.2017.04.016. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems have been suggested as a promising tool for neurorehabilitation. However, to date, there is a lack of homogeneous findings. Furthermore, no systematic reviews have analyzed the degree of validation of these interventions for upper limb (UL) motor rehabilitation poststroke. Objectives: The study aims were to compile all available studies that assess an UL intervention based on an electroencephalography (EEG) BCI system in stroke; to analyze the methodological quality of the studies retrieved; and to determine the effects of these interventions on the improvement of motor abilities. Type: This was a systematic review. Literature Survey: Searches were conducted in PubMed, PEDro, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial from inception to September 30, 2015. Methodology: This systematic review compiles all available studies that assess UL intervention based on an EEG-BCI system in patients with stroke, analyzing their methodological quality using the Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies, and determining the grade of recommendation of these interventions for improving motor abilities as established by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The articles were selected according to the following criteria: studies evaluating an EEG-based BCI intervention; studies including patients with a stroke and hemiplegia, regardless of lesion origin or temporal evolution; interventions using an EEG-based BCI to restore functional abilities of the affected UL, regardless of the interface used or its combination with other therapies; and studies using validated tools to evaluate motor function. Synthesis: After the literature search, 13 articles were included in this review: 4 studies were randomized controlled trials; 1 study was a controlled study; 4 studies were case series studies; and 4 studies were case reports. The methodological quality of the included papers ranged from 6 to 15, and the level of evidence varied from 1b to 5. The articles included in this review involved a total of 141 stroke patients. Conclusions: This systematic review suggests that BCI interventions may be a promising rehabilitation approach in subjects with stroke. Level of Evidence: II

Type: Article
Title: Use of Electroencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Systems as a Rehabilitative Approach for Upper Limb Function After a Stroke: A Systematic Review
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2017.04.016
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2017.04.016
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10042536
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