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A Study of the Natural History of Vitreomacular Traction Syndrome by OCT

Errera, M-H; Liyanage, SE; Petrou, P; Keane, PA; Moya, R; Ezra, E; Charteris, DG; (2018) A Study of the Natural History of Vitreomacular Traction Syndrome by OCT. Ophthalmology , 125 (5) pp. 701-707. 10.1016/j.ophtha.2017.10.035. Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the natural history of vitreomacular traction syndrome (VMTS) in the absence of other ocular comorbidities. DESIGN: Retrospective clinical case series. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 183 eyes of 159 patients diagnosed with VMTS with no other ocular comorbidity. METHODS: Patients with VMTS were identified from an OCT database at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. Sequential OCT scans and patient notes were reviewed over a minimum period of 6 months. Data collected included patient demographics, best-corrected visual acuity, and OCT features of vitreomacular adhesion. Contingency tests and binary logistic modeling were used to identify baseline predictors of stability and progression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The rates of spontaneous resolution (defined by release of traction), progression to full-thickness macular hole, and surgical intervention were analyzed. RESULTS: Presenting visual acuity was 0.3±0.3 logMAR units. The mean length of follow-up was 17.4±12.1 months. During this period, VMTS persisted in 60% and resolved in 20% (occurring on average at 15 months). Of the remainder, 12% developed a macular hole and 8% elected to proceed with surgery for symptoms. Focal adhesion <1500 μm was present in 87%. A premacular membrane with macular pucker (PMM) was present in 20%. With persistent VMTS, vision and central foveal thickness remained unchanged. The relative risk of resolution increased in those cases with better presenting visual acuities, lesser foveal thicknesses, and no associated PMMs; vision significantly improved in those cases with resolution. CONCLUSIONS: VMTS persists in the majority of patients but despite this, visual acuities did not deteriorate significantly over the study period unless patients developed a full-thickness macular hole or required surgical intervention for symptoms. Resolution spontaneously occurred in 20%, with an improvement in vision.

Type: Article
Title: A Study of the Natural History of Vitreomacular Traction Syndrome by OCT
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2017.10.035
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2017.10.035
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10042409
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