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Instability of default mode network connectivity in major depression: a two-sample confirmation study

Wise, T; Marwood, L; Perkins, AM; Herane-Vives, A; Joules, R; Lythgoe, DJ; Luh, W-M; ... Arnone, D; + view all (2017) Instability of default mode network connectivity in major depression: a two-sample confirmation study. Translational Psychiatry , 7 (4) , Article e1105. 10.1038/tp.2017.40. Green open access

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Abstract

Major depression is associated with altered static functional connectivity in various brain networks, particularly the default mode network (DMN). Dynamic functional connectivity is a novel tool with little application in affective disorders to date, and holds the potential to unravel fluctuations in connectivity strength over time in major depression. We assessed stability of connectivity in major depression between the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), key nodes in the DMN that are implicated in ruminative cognitions. Functional connectivity stability between the mPFC and PCC over the course of a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan was compared between medication-free patients with major depression and healthy controls matched for age, sex and handedness. We tested replicability of the results in an independent sample using multi-echo resting-state fMRI. The primary sample included 20 patients and 19 controls, while the validation sample included 19 patients and 19 controls. Greater connectivity variability was detected in major depression between mPFC and PCC. This was demonstrated in both samples indicating that the results were reliable and were not influenced by the fMRI acquisition approach used. Our results demonstrate that alterations within the DMN in major depression go beyond changes in connectivity strength and extend to reduced connectivity stability within key DMN regions. Findings were robustly replicated across two independent samples. Further research is necessary to better understand the nature of these fluctuations in connectivity and their relationship to the aetiology of major depression.

Type: Article
Title: Instability of default mode network connectivity in major depression: a two-sample confirmation study
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/tp.2017.40
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/tp.2017.40
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Adult, Brain, Brain Mapping, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Functional Neuroimaging, Gyrus Cinguli, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mood Disorders, Neural Pathways, Prefrontal Cortex, Severity of Illness Index
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10041177
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