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Brain-derived neurotrophic factor derived from sensory neurons plays a critical role in chronic pain

Sikandar, S; Minett, MS; Millet, Q; Santana, S; Lau, J; Wood, JN; Zhao, J; (2018) Brain-derived neurotrophic factor derived from sensory neurons plays a critical role in chronic pain. Brain , 141 (4) pp. 1028-1039. 10.1093/brain/awy009. Green open access

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Abstract

Many studies support the pro-nociceptive role of brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) in pain processes in the peripheral and central nervous system. We have previously shown that nociceptor-derived BDNF is involved in inflammatory pain. Microglial-derived BDNF has also been shown to be involved in neuropathic pain. However, the distinct contribution of primary afferent-derived BNDF to chronic pain processing remains undetermined. In this study, we used Avil-CreERT2 mice to delete Bdnf from all adult peripheral sensory neurons. Conditional BDNF knockouts were healthy with no sensory neuron loss. Behavioural assays and in vivo electrophysiology indicated that spinal excitability was normal. Following formalin inflammation or neuropathy with a modified Chung model, we observed normal development of acute pain behaviour, but a deficit in second phase formalin-induced nocifensive responses and a reversal of neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity during the later chronic pain phase in conditional BDNF knockout mice. In contrast, we observed normal development of acute and chronic neuropathic pain in the Seltzer model, indicating differences in the contribution of BDNF to distinct models of neuropathy. We further used a model of hyperalgesic priming to examine the contribution of primary afferent-derived BDNF in the transition from acute to chronic pain, and found that primed BDNF knockout mice do not develop prolonged mechanical hypersensitivity to an inflammatory insult. Our data suggest that BDNF derived from sensory neurons plays a critical role in mediating the transition from acute to chronic pain.

Type: Article
Title: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor derived from sensory neurons plays a critical role in chronic pain
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/brain/awy009
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awy009
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: BDNF; peripheral sensory neurons; DRG; neuropathic pain; hyperalgesic priming
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Wolfson Inst for Biomedical Research
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040493
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