UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Associations of pet ownership with biomarkers of ageing: population based cohort study

Batty, GD; Zaninotto, P; Watt, RG; Bell, S; (2017) Associations of pet ownership with biomarkers of ageing: population based cohort study. BMJ , 359 , Article j5558. 10.1136/bmj.j5558. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
bmj.j5558.full.pdf - Published version

Download (582kB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the prospective relation between animal companionship and biomarkers of ageing in older people. DESIGN: Analyses of data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, an ongoing, open, prospective cohort study initiated in 2002-03. SETTING: Nationally representative study from England. PARTICIPANTS: 8785 adults (55% women) with a mean age of 67 years (SD 9) at pet ownership assessment in 2010-11 (wave 5). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Established biomarkers of ageing in the domains of physical, immunological, and psychological function, as assessed in 2012-13 (wave 6). RESULTS: One third of study members reported pet ownership: 1619 (18%) owned a dog, 1077 (12%) a cat, and 274 (3%) another animal. After adjustment for a range of covariates, there was no evidence of a clear association of any type of pet ownership with walking speed, lung function, chair rise time, grip strength, leg raises, balance, three markers of systemic inflammation, memory, or depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION: In this population of older adults, the companionship of creatures great and small seems to essentially confer no relation with standard ageing phenotypes.

Type: Article
Title: Associations of pet ownership with biomarkers of ageing: population based cohort study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmj.j5558
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j5558
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is noncommercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040409
Downloads since deposit
57Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item