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Prevalence and related risk factors of chronic kidney disease among adults in Luxembourg: evidence from the observation of cardiovascular risk factors (ORISCAV-LUX) study

Alkerwi, A; Sauvageot, N; El Bahi, I; Delagardelle, C; Beissel, J; Noppe, S; Roderick, PJ; ... Stranges, S; + view all (2017) Prevalence and related risk factors of chronic kidney disease among adults in Luxembourg: evidence from the observation of cardiovascular risk factors (ORISCAV-LUX) study. BMC Nephrology , 18 , Article 358. 10.1186/s12882-017-0772-6. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Evidence on stages of renal impairment and related risk factors in Luxembourg is lacking. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and identify potential correlates among the general population, using the recent definition suggested by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. METHODS: Data analysed from 1361 participants aged 18-69 years, enrolled in the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg (ORISCAV-LUX) study, 2007-08. Descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify demographic, socio-economic, behavioural, and clinical factors associated with CKD, defined as a single estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measure <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or urinary albumin: creatinine ratio (ACR) > 30 mg/g. RESULTS: Overall, 6.3% had CKD, including 4.4% and 0.7% with moderate and severe macroalbuminuria respectively. 0.1% had kidney failure (eGFR < 15 ml/min/1.73 m2). CKD was higher among subjects with primary education and risk increased significantly with age; the odd ratio was more than 2-fold higher among participants aged 50-69 years. Hypertension and diabetes were associated with more than 3-fold and 4-fold higher risks of CKD [adjusted odd ratio (AOR 3.46 (95%CI 1.92, 6.24), P < 0.001] and [AOR 4.45 (2.18, 9.07), P < 0.001] respectively. Increased physical activity measured as total MET-hour/week was independently associated with a lower odds of CKD (P = 0.035). CONCLUSION: The national baseline prevalence estimate of CKD, a neglected public health problem, stresses the benefit of early detection particularly in high-risk subjects with associated cardiovascular pathologies (e.g. hypertension, diabetes), to prevent and defray costs related to eventual complications.

Type: Article
Title: Prevalence and related risk factors of chronic kidney disease among adults in Luxembourg: evidence from the observation of cardiovascular risk factors (ORISCAV-LUX) study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12882-017-0772-6
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-017-0772-6
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s). 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Albuminuria, Chronic kidney disease (CKD), Epidemiology, Glomerular filtration rate, Population-based study
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040407
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