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Cell free protein synthesis: a viable option for stratified medicines manufacturing?

Ogonah, OW; Polizzi, KM; Bracewell, DG; (2017) Cell free protein synthesis: a viable option for stratified medicines manufacturing? Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering , 18 pp. 77-83. 10.1016/j.coche.2017.10.003. Green open access

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Abstract

Stratified medicines are defined as medicines which target diseases where the patients have been preselected for treatment based on their response to a diagnostic test. The pipeline of these medicines cover a wide range of different treatment types including cell and gene therapies, vaccines based on peptides or proteins; and protein based therapies. These increasingly diverse and by definition smaller market size products require improved agility and productivity in process design if manufacture and supply of affordable medicines is to be achieved. In this paper we review the current state of cell free synthesis (CFS), the new technologies and strategies being developed and its application to the production of stratified medicines; focusing on the production of protein based therapeutic products.

Type: Article
Title: Cell free protein synthesis: a viable option for stratified medicines manufacturing?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.coche.2017.10.003
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.coche.2017.10.003
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Biochemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040197
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