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Demographic History of the Genus Pan Inferred from Whole Mitochondrial Genome Reconstructions

Lobon, I; Tucci, S; De Manuel, M; Ghirotto, S; Benazzo, A; Prado-Martinez, J; Lorente-Galdos, B; ... Marques-Bonet, T; + view all (2016) Demographic History of the Genus Pan Inferred from Whole Mitochondrial Genome Reconstructions. Genome Biology and Evolution , 8 (6) pp. 2020-2030. 10.1093/gbe/evw124. Green open access

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Abstract

The genus Pan is the closest genus to our own and it includes two species, Pan paniscus (bonobos) and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzees). The later is constituted by four subspecies, all highly endangered. The study of the Pan genera has been incessantly complicated by the intricate relationship among subspecies and the statistical limitations imposed by the reduced number of samples or genomic markers analyzed. Here, we present a new method to reconstruct complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from whole genome shotgun (WGS) datasets, mtArchitect, showing that its reconstructions are highly accurate and consistent with long-range PCR mitogenomes. We used this approach to build the mitochondrial genomes of 20 newly sequenced samples which, together with available genomes, allowed us to analyze the hitherto most complete Pan mitochondrial genome dataset including 156 chimpanzee and 44 bonobo individuals, with a proportional contribution from all chimpanzee subspecies. We estimated the separation time between chimpanzees and bonobos around 1.15 million years ago (Mya) [0.81–1.49]. Further, we found that under the most probable genealogical model the two clades of chimpanzees, Western + Nigeria-Cameroon and Central + Eastern, separated at 0.59 Mya [0.41–0.78] with further internal separations at 0.32 Mya [0.22–0.43] and 0.16 Mya [0.17–0.34], respectively. Finally, for a subset of our samples, we compared nuclear versus mitochondrial genomes and we found that chimpanzee subspecies have different patterns of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity, which could be a result of either processes affecting the mitochondrial genome, such as hitchhiking or background selection, or a result of population dynamics.

Type: Article
Title: Demographic History of the Genus Pan Inferred from Whole Mitochondrial Genome Reconstructions
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evw124
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evw124
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com.
Keywords: genome diversity, chimpanzee, bonobo, bioinformatics, next-generation sequencing, mtArchitect
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040178
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