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Factors to consider in the introduction of huddles on clinical wards: perceptions of staff on the SAFE programme

Stapley, E; Sharples, E; Lachman, P; Lakhanpaul, M; Wolpert, M; Deighton, J; (2018) Factors to consider in the introduction of huddles on clinical wards: perceptions of staff on the SAFE programme. International Journal for Quality in Health Care , 30 (1) pp. 44-49. 10.1093/intqhc/mzx162. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To explore paediatric hospital staff members’ perceptions of the emerging benefits and challenges of the huddle, a new safety improvement initiative, as well as the barriers and facilitators to its implementation. DESIGN: A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews to explore staff perspectives and experiences. SETTING: Situation Awareness For Everyone (SAFE), a safety improvement programme, was implemented on a sample of National Health Service (NHS) paediatric wards from September 2014 to June 2016. Previously untested in England, the huddle was a central component of the programme. PARTICIPANTS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 76 staff members on four wards ~4 months after the start of the programme. RESULTS: A thematic analysis showed that staff perceived the huddle as helping to increase their awareness of important issues, improve communication, facilitate teamwork, and encourage a culture of increased efficiency, anticipation and planning on the ward. Challenges of the huddle included added pressure on staff time and workload, and the potential for junior nurses to be excluded from involvement, thus perhaps inadvertently reinforcing medical hierarchies. Staff also identified several barriers and facilitators to the huddle process, including the importance of senior nursing and medical staff leadership and managing staff time and capacity issues. CONCLUSIONS: The findings point towards the potential efficacy of the huddle as a way of improving hospital staff members’ working environments and clinical practice, with important implications for other sites seeking to implement such safety improvement initiatives.

Type: Article
Title: Factors to consider in the introduction of huddles on clinical wards: perceptions of staff on the SAFE programme
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx162
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzx162
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Quality improvement, qualitative methods, risk management, children, hospital care
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040134
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