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The effect of perinatal brain injury on dopaminergic function and hippocampal volume in adult life

Froudist-Walsh, S; Bloomfield, MA; Veronese, M; Kroll, J; Karolis, VR; Jauhar, S; Bonoldi, I; ... Howes, O; + view all (2017) The effect of perinatal brain injury on dopaminergic function and hippocampal volume in adult life. eLife , 6 , Article e29088. 10.7554/eLife.29088. Green open access

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Abstract

Perinatal brain injuries, including hippocampal lesions, cause lasting changes in dopamine function in rodents, but it is not known if this occurs in humans. We compared adults who were born very preterm with perinatal brain injury to those born very preterm without perinatal brain injury, and age-matched controls born at full term using [18F]-DOPA PET and structural MRI. Dopamine synthesis capacity was reduced in the perinatal brain injury group relative to those without brain injury (Cohen's d = 1.36, p=0.02) and the control group (Cohen's d = 1.07, p=0.01). Hippocampal volume was reduced in the perinatal brain injury group relative to controls (Cohen's d = 1.17, p=0.01) and was positively correlated with striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (r = 0.344, p=0.03). This is the first evidence in humans linking neonatal hippocampal injury to adult dopamine dysfunction, and provides a potential mechanism linking early life risk factors to adult mental illness.

Type: Article
Title: The effect of perinatal brain injury on dopaminergic function and hippocampal volume in adult life
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.29088
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.29088
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2017, Froudist-Walsh et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: brain injury, brain volume, dopamine, human, imaging, neuroscience, preterm
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040008
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