UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

International multicentre randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder: TIME-A study

Crawford, MJ; Gold, C; Odell-Miller, H; Thana, L; Faber, S; Assmus, J; Bieleninik, L; ... Hassiotis, A; + view all (2017) International multicentre randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder: TIME-A study. Health Technology Assessment , 21 (59) pp. 1-40. 10.3310/hta21590. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
International multicentre randomised.pdf - Published version

Download (581kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Preliminary studies have indicated that music therapy may benefit children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of improvisational music therapy (IMT) on social affect and responsiveness of children with ASD. DESIGN: International, multicentre, three-arm, single-masked randomised controlled trial, including a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded centre that recruited in London and the east of England. Randomisation was via a remote service using permuted blocks, stratified by study site. SETTING: Schools and private, voluntary and state-funded health-care services. PARTICIPANTS: Children aged between 4 and 7 years with a confirmed diagnosis of ASD and a parent or guardian who provided written informed consent. We excluded children with serious sensory disorder and those who had received music therapy within the past 12 months. INTERVENTIONS: All parents and children received enhanced standard care (ESC), which involved three 60-minute sessions of advice and support in addition to treatment as usual. In addition, they were randomised to either one (low-frequency) or three (high-frequency) sessions of IMT per week, or to ESC alone, over 5 months in a ratio of 1 : 1 : 2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was measured using the social affect score derived from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) at 5 months: higher scores indicated greater impairment. Secondary outcomes included social affect at 12 months and parent-rated social responsiveness at 5 and 12 months (higher scores indicated greater impairment). RESULTS: A total of 364 participants were randomised between 2011 and 2015. A total of 182 children were allocated to IMT (90 to high-frequency sessions and 92 to low-frequency sessions), and 182 were allocated to ESC alone. A total of 314 (86.3%) of the total sample were followed up at 5 months [165 (90.7%) in the intervention group and 149 (81.9%) in the control group]. Among those randomised to IMT, 171 (94.0%) received it. From baseline to 5 months, mean scores of ADOS social affect decreased from 14.1 to 13.3 in music therapy and from 13.5 to 12.4 in standard care [mean difference: music therapy vs. standard care = 0.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 0.81], with no significant difference in improvement. There were also no differences in the parent-rated social responsiveness score, which decreased from 96.0 to 89.2 in the music therapy group and from 96.1 to 93.3 in the standard care group over this period (mean difference: music therapy vs. standard care = -3.32, 95% CI -7.56 to 0.91). There were seven admissions to hospital that were unrelated to the study interventions in the two IMT arms compared with 10 unrelated admissions in the ESC group. CONCLUSIONS: Adding IMT to the treatment received by children with ASD did not improve social affect or parent-assessed social responsiveness.

Type: Article
Title: International multicentre randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder: TIME-A study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3310/hta21590
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.3310/hta21590
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © Queen’s Printer and Controller of HMSO 2017. This work was produced by Crawford et al. under the terms of a commissioning contract issued by the Secretary of State for Health. This issue may be freely reproduced for the purposes of private research and study and extracts (or indeed, the full report) may be included in professional journals provided that suitable acknowledgement is made and the reproduction is not associated with any form of advertising. Applications for commercial reproduction should be addressed to: NIHR Journals Library, National Institute for Health Research, Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre, Alpha House, University of Southampton Science Park, Southampton SO16 7NS, UK.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Health Care Sciences & Services, PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, SOCIAL COMMUNICATION BEHAVIORS, DIAGNOSTIC INTERVIEW, JOINT ATTENTION, YOUNG-CHILDREN, INDIVIDUALS, AGE
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10033947
Downloads since deposit
445Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item