UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Ethical climate in a Belgian psychiatric inpatient setting: relation with burnout and engagement in psychiatric nurses

Faelens, A; Claeys, M; Sabbe, B; Schrijvers, D; Luyten, P; (2014) Ethical climate in a Belgian psychiatric inpatient setting: relation with burnout and engagement in psychiatric nurses. European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare , 1 (2) p. 443. 10.5750/ejpch.v1i2.685. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Luyten_685-2486-1-PB.pdf - Published version

Download (207kB) | Preview

Abstract

Research suggests a relation between the ethical climate – that is, the organisational conditions and practices that affect the way ethical issues with regard to patient care are discussed and decided - and job satisfaction of nurses. Yet no study to date has investigated the relationship between ethical climate and job satisfaction in psychiatric nurses. This study aimed to address this critical gap in our knowledge by investigating the relationships among ethical climate and features of both burnout and engagement based on the Job Demands-Resources Model (JD - R model) in a large cross-sectional study of 265 nurses working in a large psychiatric inpatient hospital in Flanders, Belgium. Correlational and multiple hierarchical regression analyses were used to investigate the relationship between ethical climate, burnout and engagement. In addition, based on the JD-R model, we also investigated whether engagement mediated the relationship between ethical climate on the one hand and job satisfaction and turnover intention on the other and whether ethical climate moderated the relationship between emotional burden and burnout. Results showed that a positive ethical climate was related to lower levels of emotional exhaustion and distancing and higher levels of engagement and job satisfaction. Furthermore, although ethical climate did not buffer against the effects of emotional burden on burnout, higher levels of engagement explained in part the relationship between ethical climate and job satisfaction.

Type: Article
Title: Ethical climate in a Belgian psychiatric inpatient setting: relation with burnout and engagement in psychiatric nurses
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.5750/ejpch.v1i2.685
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.5750/ejpch.v1i2.685
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Burnout, engagement, ethical climate, job wellbeing, mental healthcare, nursing
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10033054
Downloads since deposit
46Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item