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Long-term effects of Internet-supported cognitive behavior therapy

Andersson, G; Rozental, A; Shafran, RL; Carlbring, P; (2018) Long-term effects of Internet-supported cognitive behavior therapy. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics , 18 (1) pp. 21-28. 10.1080/14737175.2018.1400381. Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Internet-supported and therapist-guided cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) is effective for a range of problems in the short run, but less is known about the long-term effects with follow-ups of two years or longer. AREAS COVERED: This paper reviews studies in which the long-term effects of guided ICBT were investigated. Following literature searches in PubMed and other sources meta-analytic statistics were calculated for 14 studies involving a total of 902 participants, and an average follow-up period of three years. Studies were from Sweden (n=11) or the Netherlands (n=3). Long-term outcome studies were found for panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, depression, mixed anxiety and depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, pathological gambling, stress and chronic fatigue. The duration of the treatments was usually short (8-15 weeks). The pre-to follow-up effect size was Hedge’s g = 1.52, but with a significant heterogeneity. The average symptom improvement across studies was 50%. Treatment seeking in the follow-up period was not documented and few studies mentioned negative effects. EXPERT COMMENTARY: While effects may be overestimated, it is likely that therapist-supported ICBT can have enduring effects. Long-term follow-up data should be collected for more conditions and new technologies like smartphone-delivered treatments.

Type: Article
Title: Long-term effects of Internet-supported cognitive behavior therapy
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/14737175.2018.1400381
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14737175.2018.1400381
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: internet delivery, cognitive behaviour therapy, long-term effects, depression, anxiety, somatic problems
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10027832
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