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Migration in the Anthropocene: how collective navigation, environmental system and taxonomy shape the vulnerability of migratory species

Hardesty-Moore, M; Deinet, S; Freeman, R; Titcomb, GC; Dillon, EM; Stears, K; Klope, M; ... McCauley, DJ; + view all (2018) Migration in the Anthropocene: how collective navigation, environmental system and taxonomy shape the vulnerability of migratory species. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , 373 (1746) , Article 20170017. 10.1098/rstb.2017.0017. Green open access

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Abstract

Recent increases in human disturbance pose significant threats to migratory species using collective movement strategies. Key threats to migrants may differ depending on behavioural traits (e.g. collective navigation), taxonomy, and the environmental system (i.e. freshwater, marine, or terrestrial) associated with migration. We quantitatively assess how collective navigation, taxonomic membership, and environmental system impact species’ vulnerability by 1) evaluating population change in migratory and no n-migratory bird, mammal, and fish species using the Living Planet Database (LPD), 2) analysing the role of collective navigation and environmental system on migrant extinction risk using International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) classifications, and 3) compiling literature on geographic range change of migratory species. Likelihood of population decrease differed by taxonomic group: migratory birds were more likely to experience annual declines than non-migrants, while mammals displayed the opposite pattern. Within migratory species in IUCN, we observed that collective navigation and environmental system were important predictors of extinction risk for fishes and birds, but not for mammals, which had overall higher extinction risk than other taxa. We found high phylogenetic relatedness among collectively navigating species, which could have obscured its importance in determining extinction risk. Overall, outputs from these analyses can help guide strategic interventions to conserve the most vulnerable migrations.

Type: Article
Title: Migration in the Anthropocene: how collective navigation, environmental system and taxonomy shape the vulnerability of migratory species
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2017.0017
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2017.0017
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Migration, birds, mammals, fishes, Living Planet Database, collective navigation
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10027764
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