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The role of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) in reducing the age at hearing aid fitting in children with Hearing loss identified by newborn hearing screening

Mehta, K; Watkin, P; Baldwin, M; Marriage, J; Mahon, HM; Vickers, D; (2018) The role of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) in reducing the age at hearing aid fitting in children with Hearing loss identified by newborn hearing screening. Trends in Hearing , 21 pp. 1-16. 10.1177/2331216517744094. Green open access

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Abstract

Recording of free-field cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) responses to speech tokens was introduced into the audiology management for infants with a permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) during 2011–2015 at a U.K. service. Children with bilateral PCHI were studied from two sequential cohorts. Thirty-four children had followed an audiology pathway prior to CAEP introduction, and 44 children followed a pathway after the introduction of CAEP and were tested with unaided and aided CAEP responses. Data analysis explored the age of diagnosis, hearing aid fitting, and referral for cochlear implant (CI) assessment for each of these groups. CAEP offered a novel educative process for the parents and audiologists supporting decision-making for hearing aid fitting and CI referral. Delays in hearing aid fitting and CI referral were categorized as being due to the audiologist’s recommendation or parental choice. Results showed that the median age of hearing aid fitting prior to CAEP introduction was 9.2 months. After the inclusion of CAEP recording in the infant pathways, it was 3.9 months. This reduction was attributable to earlier fitting of hearing aids for children with mild and moderate hearing losses, for which the median age fell from 19 to 5 months. Children with profound hearing loss were referred for CI assessment at a significantly earlier age following the introduction of CAEP. Although there has also been a national trend for earlier hearing aid fitting in children, the current study demonstrates that the inclusion of CAEP recording in the pathway facilitated earlier hearing aid fitting for milder impairments.

Type: Article
Title: The role of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) in reducing the age at hearing aid fitting in children with Hearing loss identified by newborn hearing screening
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/2331216517744094
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216517744094
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://www. creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Keywords: Nearing aid, cortical auditory evoked potentials, Universal Neonatal Hearing Screen, cochlear implant, children
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10026131
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