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Oscillatory Reinstatement Enhances Declarative Memory

Javadi, A-H; Glen, JC; Halkiopoulos, S; Schulz, M; Spiers, HJ; (2017) Oscillatory Reinstatement Enhances Declarative Memory. Journal of Neuroscience , 37 (41) pp. 9939-9944. 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0265-17.2017. Green open access

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Abstract

Declarative memory recall is thought to involve the reinstatement of neural activity patterns that occurred previously during encoding. Consistent with this view, greater similarity between patterns of activity recorded during encoding and retrieval has been found to predict better memory performance in a number of studies. Recent models have argued that neural oscillations may be crucial to reinstatement for successful memory retrieval. However, to date, no causal evidence has been provided to support this theory, nor has the impact of oscillatory electrical brain stimulation during encoding and retrieval been assessed. To explore this we used transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of human participants (n = 70, 45 females, age mean (SD) = 22.12 (2.16)) during a declarative memory task. Participants received either the same frequency during encoding and retrieval (60-60 Hz or 90-90 Hz) or different frequencies (60-90 Hz or 90-60 Hz). When frequencies matched there was a significant memory improvement (at both 60 and 90 Hz) relative to sham stimulation. No improvement occurred when frequencies mismatched. Our results provide support for the role of oscillatory reinstatement in memory retrieval.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTRecent neurobiological models of memory have argued that large-scale neural oscillations are re-instated to support successful memory retrieval. Here we used transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to test these models. tACS has recently been shown to induce neural oscillations at the frequency stimulated. We stimulated over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during a declarative memory task involving learning a set of words. We found that tACS applied at the same frequency during encoding and retrieval enhances memory. We also find no difference between the two applied frequencies. Thus our results are consistent with the proposal that reinstatement of neural oscillations during retrieval supports successful memory retrieval.

Type: Article
Title: Oscillatory Reinstatement Enhances Declarative Memory
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0265-17.2017
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0265-17.2017
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: context, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), memory, oscillation, reinstatement, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS)
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Experimental Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10025135
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