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Osteomalacic and hyperparathyroid changes in fibrous dysplasia of bone: Core biopsy studies and clinical correlations

Corsi, A; Collins, MT; Riminucci, M; Howell, PGT; Boyde, A; Robey, PG; Bianco, P; (2003) Osteomalacic and hyperparathyroid changes in fibrous dysplasia of bone: Core biopsy studies and clinical correlations. J BONE MINER RES , 18 (7) 1235 - 1246.

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Abstract

Deposition, mineralization, and resorption of FD bone compared with unaffected bone from FD patients was investigated in iliac crest biopsy specimens from 13 patients. Compared with unaffected bone, lesional FD bone seemed to be very sensitive to the effects of PTH and renal phosphate wasting, which respectively bring about hyperparathyroid or osteomalacic changes in the lesional bone.Introduction: Fibrous dysplasia is a genetic noninherited disease caused by activating mutations of the GNAS1 gene, resulting in the deposition of qualitatively abnormal bone and marrow. This study was designed to learn more about the local processes of bone deposition, mineralization, and resorption within lesional fibrous dysplasia (FD) bone compared with unaffected bone of FD patients.Methods: Histology, histomorphometry, and quantitative back-scattered electron imaging (qBSE) analysis was conducted on affected and unaffected biopsy specimens from 13 patients and correlated to markers of bone metabolism.Results and Conclusions: There was a marked excess of unmineralized osteoid with a nonlamellar structure and a reduced mineral content in mineralized bone within FD lesions (p < 0.001). A negative correlation (p = 0.05) between osteoid thickness (O.Th) and renal tubular phosphate reabsorption (measured as TmP/GFR) was observed for lesional bone, but not for unaffected bone, in which no histological or histomorphometric evidence of osteomalacia was observed in patients with renal phosphate wasting. Histological and histomorphometric evidence of increased bone resorption was variable in lesional bone and correlated with serum levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Hyperparathyroidism-related histological changes were observed in fibrous dysplastic bone, but not in the unaffected bone, of patients with elevated serum PTH secondary to vitamin D deficiency. Our data indicate that, compared with unaffected bone, lesional FD bone is very sensitive to the effects of PTH and renal phosphate wasting, which, respectively, bring about hyperparathyroid or osteomalacic changes in the lesional bone. Osteomalacic and hyperparathyroid changes, which emanate from distinct metabolic derangements (which superimpose on the local effects of GNAS1 mutations in bone), influence, in turn, the severity and type of skeletal morbidity in FD.

Type:Article
Title:Osteomalacic and hyperparathyroid changes in fibrous dysplasia of bone: Core biopsy studies and clinical correlations
Keywords:fibrous dysplasia, bone pathology, bone turnover, hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia, histology, backscattered electron imaging, MCCUNE-ALBRIGHT SYNDROME, ACTIVATING G(S)ALPHA MUTATION, RENAL TUBULAR REABSORPTION, TUMOR-INDUCED OSTEOMALACIA, STIMULATORY G-PROTEIN, GENE, PHOSPHATE, HISTOMORPHOMETRY, DYSFUNCTION, CHILDREN
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of)
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute

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