UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The Ambiguity of Landscape: discussing points of relatedness in concepts and methods

Hamilton, S; (2011) The Ambiguity of Landscape: discussing points of relatedness in concepts and methods. In: Cochrane, E and Gardner, A, (eds.) Evolutionary and Interpretive Archaeologies: a discussion. Left Coast Press: Walnut Creek, CA.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This chapter concerns the long tradition of landscape archaeology and the contribution of major theoretical frameworks — processual, evolutionary and interpretative — to the elucidation of the past use and understanding(s) of landscapes, particularly as social space. Many would consider that landscape is the research area in which interpretative archaeology has been the most successfully put into practice, while phenomenological approaches to landscape archaeology have been the most predominant and critiqued interpretative approach. This chapter seeks to consider the communality, as well as the differences and factions, between these distinct traditions and frameworks of landscape archaeology, particularly with respect to the cultural use of landscape; be it everyday landscapes, or landscapes where exceptional orchestrated, or occasional, ritual events took place. It makes a case for phenomenology and a wider development of sensory perspectives being key tools of field enquiry — for characterising past social space and investigating the roles of landscape and human perception of space in creating discrete social identities and interpretations of place. In conclusion, the potential for developing dialogues between processual, evolutionary and interpretative archaeologies of landscape, both in fieldwork and in the interpretative issues that these differing approaches do share in common, is highlighted and advocated.

Type: Book chapter
Title: The Ambiguity of Landscape: discussing points of relatedness in concepts and methods
Keywords: landscape archaeology, phenomenology
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology Gordon Square
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/980372
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item