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LIPOPROTEIN-LIPASE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH COMBINED HYPERLIPEMIA

SEED, M; MAILLY, F; VALLANCE, D; DOHERTY, E; WINDER, A; TALMUD, P; HUMPHRIES, SE; (1994) LIPOPROTEIN-LIPASE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH COMBINED HYPERLIPEMIA. CLIN INVESTIGATOR , 72 (2) 100 - 106.

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Abstract

The aetiology of familial combined hyperlipidaemia remains obscure, with both genetic and environmental factors contributing to the phenotype, which is frequently associated with premature coronary heart disease. We have studied lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and hepatic lipase (HL) activity in patients with coronary heart disease to determine whether variation in lipase activities contributes to this phenotype. Forty-one patients (mean age 50 years; 30 male) were selected on the basis of cholesterol levels above 6.5 mmol/l and triglyceride levels above 2.2 mmol/l, with apoprotein B values over the 90th percentile. There was a family history of premature coronary heart disease in 78% and a personal history in 64%, at mean age 44, the patient group therefore predominantly corresponded to the common definition of familial combined hyperlipidaemia, appropriate in the absence of molecular markers. None of the patients was diabetic; hypertension and smoking were not over represented. Blood samples were taken following intravenous administration of heparin (100 IU/kg body wt), and LPL and HL activities were measured. Mean post-heparin LPL was significantly lower in patients than controls 10 min after heparin administration (2.98 +/- 1.04 and 3.86 +/- 0.93 mu mol ml(-1) h(-1), respectively, P = 0.001), and 37% patients had values below the 10th percentile of controls. Both male and female patients had significantly higher HL activities than their respective controls at 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes postheparin. As expected, both female patients and controls had lower HL activities than males, although this sex difference did not reach statistical significance in the patient group. Mean lipid and lipoprotein results were: cholesterol 8.2 mmol/l; triglycerides 4.2 mmol/l; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 0.90 mmol/l; apoprotein Al 122 mg/dl; apoprotein B 171 mg/dl; lipoprotein (a) 23 mg/dl (median 10 mg/dl). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were negatively correlated (r = -0.26, P = 0.05). HL was significantly related to body mass index at all time points whereas the negative correlation between post-heparin LPL and body mass index was significant only 30 min after heparin administration. Post-heparin LPL was only weakly correlated with triglycerides 10 and 20 min after heparin administration. These lipid and lipoprotein results are clearly potentially atherogenic as indicated by the extent of premature coronary heart disease in the group described. A decrease in LPL activity may contribute to this pattern.

Type:Article
Title:LIPOPROTEIN-LIPASE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH COMBINED HYPERLIPEMIA
Keywords:FAMILIAL COMBINED HYPERLIPEMIA, LIPOPROTEINS, LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE, HEPATIC LIPASE, FAMILIAL COMBINED HYPERLIPIDEMIA, LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN, CORONARY HEART-DISEASE, MIDDLE-AGED MEN, MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION, APOLIPOPROTEIN-B, HEPATIC LIPASE, COMBINED HYPERLIPEMIA, DRUG-THERAPY, LIPID-LEVELS
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science

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