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Role for CCG-trinucleotide repeats in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

Auer, RL; Jones, C; Müllenbach, RA; Syndercombe-Court, ; Milligan, DW; Fegan, CD; Cotter, FE; (2001) Role for CCG-trinucleotide repeats in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Blood , 97 (2) pp. 509-515.

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Abstract

Chromosome 11q deletions are frequently observed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in association with progressive disease and a poor prognosis. A minimal region of deletion has been assigned to 11q22-q23. Trinucleotide repeats have been associated with anticipation in disease, and evidence of anticipation has been observed in various malignancies including CLL. Loss of heterozygosity at 11q22-23 is common in a wide range of cancers, suggesting this is an unstable area prone to chromosome breakage. The location of 8 CCG-trinucleotide repeats on 11q was determined by Southern blot analysis of a 40-Mb YAC and PAC contig spanning 11q22-qter. Deletion breakpoints in CLL are found to co-localize at specific sites on 11q where CCG repeats are located. In addition, a CCG repeat has been identified within the minimal region of deletion. Specific alleles of this repeat are associated with worse prognosis. Folate-sensitive fragile sites are regions of late replication and are characterized by CCG repeats. The mechanism for chromosome deletion at 11q could be explained by a delay in replication. Described here is an association between CCG repeats and chromosome loss suggesting that in vivo "fragile sites" exist on 11q and that the instability of CCG repeats may play an important role in the pathogenesis of CLL

Type: Article
Title: Role for CCG-trinucleotide repeats in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia
Additional information: Label: My CV
Keywords: Alleles, analysis, CANCER, Chromosome, Chromosome Breakage, Chromosome Deletion, COMMON, DISEASE, HETEROZYGOSITY, loss of heterozygosity, Prognosis, Role, Southern
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/94152
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