UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

An inner city GP unit versus conventional care for elderly patients: prospective comparison of health functioning, use of services and patient satisfaction

Boston, NK; Boynton, PM; Hood, S; (2001) An inner city GP unit versus conventional care for elderly patients: prospective comparison of health functioning, use of services and patient satisfaction. FAM PRACT , 18 (2) 141 - 148.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Background. GP units are generally nurse-led wards, where GPs have direct admitting rights and retain clinical responsibility for their patients. While Gf-led wards are not new, they are relatively uncommon in urban areas. In addition, there has been little comparative evaluation of this type of service.Objectives. The aim of the present study was to compare patients admitted to an inner city GP unit with comparable patients in conventional care (e.g. district nursing, nursing/residential homes, acute care of the elderly wards) in terms of mental and physical functioning, use of health and social services and patient satisfaction.Methods. Study group patients were those admitted to the GP unit; comparison group patients were identified by GP practices or conventional services who had agreed to participate in the study. Suitable patients were aged 65 years or over and fitted the eligibility criteria for the GP unit. Patients were interviewed at th me time points: admission to either the GP unit or conventional care, and at 1 and 3 months after admission. Baseline comparability was assessed by demographic and medical data, cognitive function, mental state, social support, use of health and social services, and mental and physical functioning (SF-12). Mental and physical functioning and use of health and social services were compared between the groups over time. Patient satisfaction with their care was also compared between groups.Results. Change in the mental and physical functioning between patients on the GP unit (n = 67) and those in conventional care (n = 60) did not differ when the groups were compared at any of the three time points. However, the mental function of patients in the GP unit significantly improved between admission and 1 month after admission (P < 0.05). This effect was not sustained at 3 months after admission. GP unit patients were consistently more positive about the care they received than patients receiving conventional care; this included communication and information, staff, care and the facilities. Both groups of patients were high users of health and social services, with similar patterns of use in both groups, which did not alter over time.Conclusions. Patients who received care on the GP unit experienced a similar physical outcome to patients in conventional settings; however, they appeared to enjoy a short-term improvement in mental functioning and were consistently more positive about the quality of their care. This study has important policy implications with regard to planning future intermediate care services and will be of particular interest to health service planners and those responsible for clinical governance.

Type: Article
Title: An inner city GP unit versus conventional care for elderly patients: prospective comparison of health functioning, use of services and patient satisfaction
Keywords: elderly care, intermediate care, satisfaction
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > UCL Medical School
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/92744
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item