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The classical pathway is the dominant complement pathway required for innate immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice

Brown, JS; Hussell, T; Gilliland, SM; Holden, DW; Paton, JC; Ehrenstein, MR; Walport, MJ; (2002) The classical pathway is the dominant complement pathway required for innate immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice. P NATL ACAD SCI USA , 99 (26) 16969 - 16974. 10.1073/pnas.012669199.

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Abstract

The complement system is an important component of the innate immune response to bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The classical complement pathway is activated by antibody-antigen complexes on the bacterial surface and has been considered predominately to be an effector of the adaptive immune response, whereas the alternative and mannose-binding lectin pathways are activated directly by bacterial cell surface components and are considered effectors of the innate immune response. Recently, a role has been suggested for the classical pathway during innate immunity that is activated by natural IgM or components of the acute-phase response bound to bacterial pathogens. However, the functional importance of the classical pathway for innate immunity to S. pneumoniae and other bacterial pathogens, and its relative contribution compared with the alternative and mannose-binding lectin pathways has not been defined. By using strains of mice with genetic deficiencies of complement components and secretory IgM we have investigated the role of each complement pathway and natural IgM for innate immunity to S. pneumoniae. Our results show that the proportion of a population of S. pneumoniae bound by C3 depends mainly on the classical pathway, whereas the intensity of C3 binding depends on the alternative pathway. Furthermore, the classical pathway, partially targeted by the binding of natural IgM to bacteria, is the dominant pathway for activation of the complement system during innate immunity to S. pneumoniae, loss of which results in rapidly progressing septicemia and impaired macrophage activation. These data demonstrate the vital role of the classical pathway for innate immunity to a bacterial pathogen.

Type: Article
Title: The classical pathway is the dominant complement pathway required for innate immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.012669199
Keywords: C-REACTIVE-PROTEIN, INVASIVE PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION, ANTIBODY-INDEPENDENT BINDING, BACTERIAL-INFECTION, COMPONENT C1Q, ACTIVATION, SUSCEPTIBILITY, PROTECTION, CLEARANCE, DEFICIENT
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/8252
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