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Trends in alcohol intake by education and marital status in an urban population in Russia between the mid 1980s and the mid 1990s

Malyutina, S; Bobak, M; Kurilovitch, S; Nikitin, Y; Marmot, M; (2004) Trends in alcohol intake by education and marital status in an urban population in Russia between the mid 1980s and the mid 1990s. ALCOHOL ALCOHOLISM , 39 (1) 64 - 69. 10.1093/alcalc/agh022.

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Abstract

Aims: We investigated changes in the distribution of alcohol consumption by education and marital status in Russia during the period of societal transformation after 1990. Such changes would indicate the potential role of alcohol in the rising social inequalities in mortality. Methods: We analysed data from three surveys in random population samples conducted in Novosibirsk as part of the WHO MONICA project in 1985/86 (1533 men, 1292 women), 1988/89 (1700 men, no women) and 1994/95 (1526 men, 1510 women), coinciding with the period of societal transformation. Four measures of drinking were examined in relation to education and marital status: prevalence of drinking at least twice a week; the mean intake in the last week; the mean intake per drinking occasion; and the prevalence of binge drinking (>80 g ethanol for men and >60 g for women) at least once a month. Results: Among men, those with university education had the lowest levels of all measures of drinking. Drinking indices increased over time in all educational groups but most sharply in men with high education, thus leading to a smaller education-related difference in the last survey. With respect to marital status, divorced and widowed men tended to drink most, but the pattern was inconsistent, and the difference between divorced and married men also narrowed over time. Among women, alcohol intake increased between the first and last survey. Differences by education and marital status in women were smaller than in men, and binge drinking was inversely related to education. Conclusions: All indices of alcohol consumption in men increased between the mid 1980s and the mid 1990s. The increase in alcohol intake among men was proportionally similar across categories of education and marital status but the absolute differences increased. The contribution of alcohol to the increase in social differentials in mortality in the 1990s was probably modest.

Type: Article
Title: Trends in alcohol intake by education and marital status in an urban population in Russia between the mid 1980s and the mid 1990s
DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agh022
Keywords: PROSPECTIVE COHORT, EASTERN-EUROPE, BINGE DRINKING, MORTALITY, CONSUMPTION, HEAVY, NOVOSIBIRSK, SAMPLE, ADULTS, LEVEL
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/81689
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