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New developments in fibroblast and myofibroblast biology: implications for fibrosis and scleroderma.

Abraham, DJ; Eckes, B; Rajkumar, V; Krieg, T; (2007) New developments in fibroblast and myofibroblast biology: implications for fibrosis and scleroderma. Curr Rheumatol Rep , 9 (2) pp. 136-143.

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Abstract

The concept of mesenchymal fibroblasts has evolved over the past two decades from a relatively inert structural cell type to a dynamic, pluripotent cell lineage controlling normal connective tissue formation, homeostasis, and repair and as principle players in pathogenic scarring and fibrosis. In wound healing and tissue repair, fibroblasts provide proinflammatory signals and synthesize interstitial collagens, fibronectins, and other matrix components to repair the damaged tissue. Fibroblasts can differentiate into the myofibroblast, a specialized contractile cell type responsible for wound closure, tissue contraction, and scarring. This article reviews our current understanding of the origins of mesenchymal cells and their role in excessive scarring and fibrogenesis and in the systemic fibrotic disease scleroderma.

Type: Article
Title: New developments in fibroblast and myofibroblast biology: implications for fibrosis and scleroderma.
Location: United States
Keywords: Cell Differentiation, Fibroblasts, Fibrosis, Humans, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Scleroderma, Systemic, Signal Transduction
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/78352
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