UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Comparison between ATSR2 stereo, MOS O2-A band and ground-based cloud top heights

Muller, J; (2007) Comparison between ATSR2 stereo, MOS O2-A band and ground-based cloud top heights. International Journal of Remote Sensing , 28 (9) pp. 1969-1987. 10.1080/01431160600641806. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
Naudetal_IJRS_2005.pdf

Download (2MB)

Abstract

A new method to retrieve cloud top heights stereoscopically using the dual-view facility of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer 2 (ATSR2) instrument is assessed. This assessment is performed through a comparison of the cloud top heights obtained from ATSR2 stereo and those derived from a 94-GHz radar, radiosonde profiles and independently from the Modular Optoelectronic Scanner (MOS) using the O2-A band. The data for this study were collected over the United Kingdom from September 1998 through March 1999. The results show that the accuracy of the ATSR2 stereo heights is generally as predicted on theoretical grounds, with the errors in the 1.6 μm and 0.65 μm stereo heights rarely exceeding 2 km. Case study periods with disagreements between the ATSR2 heights and the ground-based retrievals are often due to the lack of precise match-ups between the ground-based and satellite scenes, while the MOS O2-A band is shown sometimes to miss the tops of high clouds. Evidence that the 11 μm channel is more sensitive to high clouds than originally thought is given and a future application of multi-spectral stereo cloud top heights is proposed.A new method to retrieve cloud top heights stereoscopically using the dual-view facility of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer 2 (ATSR2) instrument is assessed. This assessment is performed through a comparison of the cloud top heights obtained from ATSR2 stereo and those derived from a 94-GHz radar, radiosonde profiles and independently from the Modular Optoelectronic Scanner (MOS) using the O2-A band. The data for this study were collected over the United Kingdom from September 1998 through March 1999. The results show that the accuracy of the ATSR2 stereo heights is generally as predicted on theoretical grounds, with the errors in the 1.6 μm and 0.65 μm stereo heights rarely exceeding 2 km. Case study periods with disagreements between the ATSR2 heights and the ground-based retrievals are often due to the lack of precise match-ups between the ground-based and satellite scenes, while the MOS O2-A band is shown sometimes to miss the tops of high clouds. Evidence that the 11 μm channel is more sensitive to high clouds than originally thought is given and a future application of multi-spectral stereo cloud top heights is proposed.

Type: Article
Title: Comparison between ATSR2 stereo, MOS O2-A band and ground-based cloud top heights
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/01431160600641806
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01431160600641806
Language: English
Additional information: This is an early version of the paper. The definitive version is available only to subscribers of the journal by following the link to the Taylor & Francis website (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01431160600641806). The paper should be cited as: Naud, C. and Michell, K.L. and Muller, J.-P. and Clothiaux, E.E. and Albert, P. and Preusker, R. and Fischer, J. and Hogan, R.J. (2007) Comparison between ATSR2 stereo, MOS O2-A band and ground-based cloud top heights. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 28 (9). pp. 1969-1987. Special Issue: CLOUDMAP: New satellite cloud products for cirrus and contrails for NWP and climate analysis.
UCL classification: UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Space and Climate Physics
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/733
Downloads since deposit
233Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item