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Political complexity predicts the spread of ethnolinguistic groups

Currie, TE; Mace, R; (2009) Political complexity predicts the spread of ethnolinguistic groups. P NATL ACAD SCI USA , 106 (18) 7339 - 7344. 10.1073/pnas.0804698106. Gold open access

Abstract

Human languages show a remarkable degree of variation in the area they cover. However, the factors governing the distribution of human cultural groups such as languages are not well understood. While previous studies have examined the role of a number of environmental variables the importance of cultural factors has not been systematically addressed. Here we use a geographical information system (GIS) to integrate information about languages with environmental, ecological, and ethnographic data to test a number of hypotheses that have been proposed to explain the global distribution of languages. We show that the degree of political complexity and type of subsistence strategy exhibited by societies are important predictors of the area covered by a language. Political complexity is also strongly associated with the latitudinal gradient in language area, whereas subsistence strategy is not. We argue that a process of cultural group selection favoring more complex societies may have been important in shaping the present-day global distribution of language diversity.

Type:Article
Title:Political complexity predicts the spread of ethnolinguistic groups
Open access status:An open access publication
DOI:10.1073/pnas.0804698106
Publisher version:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC2670878/?tool=pubmed
Keywords:cultural diversity, cultural evolution, cultural group selection, language diversity, latitudinal gradient, ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS, LATITUDINAL GRADIENT, CULTURAL-DIVERSITY, GLOBAL PATTERNS, LANGUAGES, BIODIVERSITY, SELECTION, DENSITY, CLIMATE, EVOLVE
UCL classification:UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences > Anthropology

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