UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Academic organizations and new industrial fields: Berkeley and Stanford after the rise of biotechnology

Jong, S; (2008) Academic organizations and new industrial fields: Berkeley and Stanford after the rise of biotechnology. RESEARCH POLICY , 37 (8) 1267 - 1282. 10.1016/j.respol.2008.05.001.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The increasing intertwining of academic and commercial research networks has led to fundamental changes in the organization of modern science. Industry links not only affect the professional dynamics within individual scholarly communities but also affect the position of these communities in their broader academic environment. This paper outlines how industry ties open up opportunities for scientific institution builders to strengthen the legitimacy of their fields of scientific enquiry within this environment. How an academic environment shapes efforts by institution-builders to pursue these opportunities is examined in the context of reorganizations in the life sciences at the University of California at Berkeley and Stanford University following the rise of biotechnology during the 1980s and 1990s. This study also highlights how different models of technology transfer shaped the organizational structures of the expansionist initiatives pushed through at these two universities by molecular biologists with close industry ties. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Academic organizations and new industrial fields: Berkeley and Stanford after the rise of biotechnology
DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2008.05.001
Keywords: biotechnology, molecular biology, academic entrepreneurship, institutional theory, university organizations, NATIONAL SURVEY, SCIENCE, KNOWLEDGE, BIOCHEMISTRY, SCIENTISTS, NETWORKS, BIRTH, FIRMS, US
UCL classification: UCL > School of BEAMS
UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Management Science and Innovation
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/67190
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item