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The functional anatomy of recovery from auditory agnosia - A PET study of sound categorization in a neurological patient and normal controls

Engelien, A; Silbersweig, D; Stern, E; Huber, W; Doring, W; Frith, C; Frackowiak, RSJ; (1995) The functional anatomy of recovery from auditory agnosia - A PET study of sound categorization in a neurological patient and normal controls. BRAIN , 118 1395 - 1409.

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Abstract

(H2O)-O-15-PET was used to investigate the functional anatomy of recovery in a patient (J.B.) with bilateral perisylvian strokes and auditory agnosia, who partially regained the ability to recognize environmental sounds, but remained clinically word-deaf The patient and a group of six normal volunteers were scanned in the following three conditions: (i) passive listening to environmental sounds; (ii) categorization of environmental sounds; (iii) at rest In normal subjects, passive listening as compared with rest was associated with significant activations in the auditory cortices and posterior thalami, and in the inferior parietal lobe and anterior insula/frontal opercular region on the right. In J.B., activations were observed in the spared auditory cortex and inferior parietal lobe of the right hemisphere and in regions adjacent to the perisylvian lesion in the left hemisphere (anterior insula/frontal opercular region, middle temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobe). The recovered function, as measured by categorization of sounds compared with passive listening, in J.B. was associated with bilateral activation of a distributed network comprising (pre)frontal, middle temporal and inferior parietal cortices, as well as the right cerebellum and the right caudate nucleus. In addition, there was a left-sided activation of the anterior cingulate gyrus. In normal subjects, the same categorization task led to activation of a network comprising (pre)frontal, middle temporal and inferior parietal cortices in the left hemisphere only. These results suggest that bilateral activation (with recruitment of areas homologous to those known to be responsible for normal function), the engagement of peri-infarct regions, and the involvement of a more widespread neocortical network, are mechanisms of functional reorganization after injury that may enable recovery from, or compensation for cognitive deficits.

Type:Article
Title:The functional anatomy of recovery from auditory agnosia - A PET study of sound categorization in a neurological patient and normal controls
Keywords:auditory agnosia, recovery, audition, cognition, PET, POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY, CEREBRAL BLOOD-FLOW, RETRACTABLE SEPTA, AUTOMATED ALGORITHM, HUMAN BRAIN, CORTEX, DISCRIMINATION, CEREBELLUM, MOTOR, LOCALIZATION
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Neurology

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