UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Insight into absorption of radiation/energy transfer in infrared matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization: the roles of matrices, water and metal substrates

Talrose, VL; Person, MD; Whittal, RM; Walls, FC; Burlingame, AL; Baldwin, MA; (1999) Insight into absorption of radiation/energy transfer in infrared matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization: the roles of matrices, water and metal substrates. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry , 13 (21) 2191 - 2198.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Although the ionization/desorption mechanisms in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) remain poorly understood, there is a clear difference between the energy absorption processes in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) modes of operation. UV-MALDI demands an on-resonance electronic transition in the matrix compound, whereas results presented here support earlier work showing that a corresponding resonant vibrational transition is not a requirement for IR-MALDI. In fact, data from the present study suggest that significant absorption of radiant energy by a potential matrix impairs its performance, although this observation is at variance with some other reports. For example, sinapinic acid, with an IR absorption maximum close to the 2.94 micrometer wavelength of the Er-YAG laser, has been little used as an IR-MALDI matrix. By contrast, succinic acid, with much lower IR absorption and no history of use in UV-MALDI as it has no UV absorption at the wavelength of common UV lasers, has become widely recognized as a good general purpose matrix for IR-MALDI. Despite reports by others that glycerol is an effective matrix for IR-MALDI, we find that glycerol, which also absorbs strongly at 2.94 micrometer, is useful only if applied as a very thin film. Thus the cumulative evidence for the role of the matrix in IR-MALDI appears confusing and often contradictory. Water has been postulated to be a major contributor to the absorption of energy in IR-MALDI. Consistent with this, we find that samples dried from D(2)O, which does not absorb at 2.94 micrometer, give spectra of inferior quality compared with the same samples from H(2)O. Similarly, samples dried under vacuum, that probably contain less water than those dried in the open laboratory, give weaker and more erratic spectra. Another potential participant in energy absorption and energy transfer is the surface of the metal support, an alternative mechanism for IR-MALDI, for which some evidence is presented here. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Type:Article
Title:Insight into absorption of radiation/energy transfer in infrared matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization: the roles of matrices, water and metal substrates
Additional information:UI - 99454730 LA - Eng RN - 0 (Metals) RN - 7732-18-5 (Water) RN - 7782-39-0 (Deuterium) PT - JOURNAL ARTICLE ID - RR 01614/RR/NCRR DA - 20000111 IS - 0951-4198 SB - M CY - ENGLAND JC - A9Q AA - Author EM - 200003
Keywords:matrices, Water, Id, California, chemistry, Chemistry, Physical, Deuterium, Metals, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Spectrophotometry, Infrared, Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet, Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared, Support, Non-U.S.Gov't, Support, U.S.Gov't, P.H.S., ANS, Acids, history, laboratory
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of)

Archive Staff Only: edit this record