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Is chair rise performance a useful measure of leg power?

Hardy, R; Cooper, R; Shah, I; Harridge, S; Guralnik, J; Kuh, D; (2010) Is chair rise performance a useful measure of leg power? AGING CLIN EXP RES , 22 (5-6) 412 - 418. Gold open access

Abstract

Background and aims: Chair rise performance, which is simple to assess in a home or clinic setting, has been used as a method of predicting leg power deficit in older adults. More recently, chair rise performance has been assessed in younger populations as a baseline for assessment of subsequent age-related declines in function and power. However, as rising from a chair repeatedly not only requires lower limb strength and power but also good balance and coordination, it may not be purely a measure of leg power especially among these younger, well functioning groups who are yet to experience age-related declines and deficits in function. The aim of this study was to assess whether chair rise performance can be considered as a predictor of leg power, and hence of deficits in this, in men and women in mid-life. We assessed the relationship of chair rise performance with leg extensor power (LEP), measured using the Nottingham Power Rig (NPR), and with standing balance performance. Methods: LEP was measured in a clinic setting in a sub-sample of 81 men and 93 women from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, a nationally representative cohort born in Britain in 1946. The time taken to rise from a chair 10 times and standing balance time were assessed during home visits at the same age. Results: Increasing LEP was associated with better chair rise performance among those who completed 10 chair rises in >= 15 seconds, after adjustment for body size (p=0.008). Better standing balance performance was associated with better chair rise performance in men, but not women. Conclusions: That LEP and standing balance are both related to chair rise time in men suggests that chair rise time should not be thought of purely as a proxy measure of leg power in middle-aged populations. This has implications for longitudinal studies which want to study age-related decline in chair rise performance. (Aging Clin Exp Res 2010; 22: 412-418) (C) 2010, Editrice Kurtis

Type: Article
Title: Is chair rise performance a useful measure of leg power?
Open access status: An open access publication
Publisher version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC32606...
Keywords: Chair rises, leg extensor power, physical performance, standing balance, MIDLIFE PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE, LOWER-EXTREMITY FUNCTION, FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE, OLDER-PEOPLE, BIRTH COHORT, STRENGTH, WOMEN, DISABILITY, MOBILITY, HEALTH
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/55933
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