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The working conditions and health of non-permanent employees: are there differences between private and public labour markets?

Virtanen, P.; Saloniemi, A.; Vahtera, J.; Kivimäki, M.; Virtanen, M.; Koskenvuo, M.; (2006) The working conditions and health of non-permanent employees: are there differences between private and public labour markets? Economic and Industrial Democracy , 27 (1) pp. 39-65. 10.1177/0143831X06061072.

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Abstract

Increasing levels of non-permanent employment have raised concern about quality of working life in the public sector. This Finnish study examines whether the public sector can be characterized as a ‘model employer’ with regard to the working conditions and well-being of fixed-term employees. Compared to the private sector, the difference in the physical load between non-permanent and permanent employees is significantly smaller in the public sector. Comparison of psychosocial strain shows a difference in favour of non-permanent employees, particularly among women working in the public sector. The association between type of employment contract and health is similar in both sectors. The equality between permanent and nonpermanent employees gives reason to benchmark the public sector as a model, even if the present findings may be due partly to sectorspecific occupational structures.

Type: Article
Title: The working conditions and health of non-permanent employees: are there differences between private and public labour markets?
DOI: 10.1177/0143831X06061072
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0143831X06061072
Language: English
Keywords: Health, job content questionnaire, labour market sector, non-permanent employment, physical job load
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/5519
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