UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Multiple imputation for body mass index: lessons from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

Mishra, GD; Dobson, AJ; (2004) Multiple imputation for body mass index: lessons from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Stat.Med. , 23 (19) pp. 3077-3087.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

In large epidemiological studies missing data can be a problem, especially if information is sought on a sensitive topic or when a composite measure is calculated from several variables each affected by missing values. Multiple imputation is the method of choice for 'filling in' missing data based on associations among variables. Using an example about body mass index from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, we identify a subset of variables that are particularly useful for imputing values for the target variables. Then we illustrate two uses of multiple imputation. The first is to examine and correct for bias when data are not missing completely at random. The second is to impute missing values for an important covariate; in this case omission from the imputation process of variables to be used in the analysis may introduce bias. We conclude with several recommendations for handling issues of missing data

Type: Article
Title: Multiple imputation for body mass index: lessons from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Additional information: DA - 20040907IS - 0277-6715 (Print)LA - engPT - Journal ArticlePT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tSB - IMCV: 51
Keywords: analysis, Australia, Bias (Epidemiology), Body Height, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Middle Aged, NUTRITION, WOMEN, Women's Health
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/52346
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item