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Formally justifying user-centred design rules: A case study on post-completion errors

Curzon, P; Blandford, A; (2004) Formally justifying user-centred design rules: A case study on post-completion errors. In: Boiten, E and Derrick, J and Smith, G, (eds.) Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Integrated Formal Methods. (461 - 480). Springer Berlin: Heidelberg. Green open access

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Abstract

Interactive systems combine a human operator with a computer. Either may be a source of error. The verification processes used must ensure both the correctness of the computer component, and also minimize the risk of human error. Human-centred design aims to do this by designing systems in a way that make allowance for human frailty. One approach to such design is to adhere to design rules. Design rules, however, are often ad hoc. We examine how a formal cognitive model, encapsulating results from the cognitive sciences, can be used to justify such design rules in a way that integrates their use with existing formal hardware verification techniques. We consider here the verification of a design rule intended to prevent a commonly occurring class of human error know as the post-completion error.

Type:Book chapter
Title:Formally justifying user-centred design rules: A case study on post-completion errors
ISBN:3-540-21377-5
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI:10.1007/b96106
Additional information:Imported via OAI, 7:29:01 6th Mar 2008
UCL classification:UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Computer Science

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