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Modelling the impact of changes in sensitivity on the outcomes of the UK breast screening programme.

Taylor, P; (2010) Modelling the impact of changes in sensitivity on the outcomes of the UK breast screening programme. J Med Screen , 17 (1) pp. 31-36. 10.1258/jms.2009.009048.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact on breast cancer mortality of improving the sensitivity of breast screening programmes. METHODS: A Markov model was populated with data obtained from published statistics describing the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme and the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the UK. The model was used to study the impact of changes to the sensitivity of screening. The effects on cancer detection rates and breast cancers and total mortality was studied for a cohort of women followed from age 45 to age 89. RESULTS: Running the model from age 45 to 89, with sensitivity set at the baseline value of 75%, predicts the detection at screening of 44 cancers per thousand of population and the detection outside screening of 82 cancers per thousand of population. Running the model with values of sensitivity from 75% to 95% shows the proportion of cancers detected at screening increasing as screening improves, and deaths from breast cancer falling. The drop in breast cancer deaths is however modest. Increasing sensitivity from 75% to 85% reduces the number of breast cancer deaths from 28 to 27 per thousand. CONCLUSIONS: Likely achievable improvements in the sensitivity of screening do not have a marked effect on breast cancer mortality.

Type: Article
Title: Modelling the impact of changes in sensitivity on the outcomes of the UK breast screening programme.
Location: England
DOI: 10.1258/jms.2009.009048
Keywords: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Breast Neoplasms, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Great Britain, Humans, Middle Aged, Models, Theoretical
UCL classification: UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/465170
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