UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Electrophysiological correlates of memory encoding are task-dependent

Otten, LJ; Rugg, MD; (2001) Electrophysiological correlates of memory encoding are task-dependent. COGNITIVE BRAIN RES , 12 (1) 11 - 18.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to investigate whether the neural correlates of successful episodic encoding differ according to the nature of the study task. At study, 16 subjects were cued to make either animacy or alphabetic decisions about visually presented words. A recognition memory test with confidence judgements followed after a delay of 30 min. For the animacy task, words that were subsequently confidently recognised were associated with a positive-going ERP modulation. By contrast, for the alphabetic task, confident recognition was associated with a negative-going ERP modulation. Both types of subsequent memory effects started shortly after word onset. These findings suggest that the neural correlates of memory encoding differ qualitatively, rather than quantitatively, according to the nature of the Study task. Episodic encoding thus seems to be supported by multiple, task-specific, neural systems. The early onset of these memory effects suggests that episodic encoding can be facilitated by processes that start before the onset of the to-be-encoded item. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Type:Article
Title:Electrophysiological correlates of memory encoding are task-dependent
Keywords:confidence judgement, depth of processing, episodic encoding, event-related potential, subsequent memory effect, recognition memory, RECOGNITION MEMORY, BRAIN POTENTIALS, RECALL, RECOLLECTION, REPETITION, RETRIEVAL, PREDICTS, CORTEX, ERPS
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences

Archive Staff Only: edit this record