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What do pregnant women think about the HIV test? A qualitative study

Boyd, FM; Simpson, WM; Johnstone, FD; Hart, GJ; Goldberg, DJ; (1999) What do pregnant women think about the HIV test? A qualitative study. AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV , 11 (1) 21 - 29. 10.1080/09540129948171.

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Abstract

Before any new antenatal screening test is introduced, the opinions of pregnant women should be considered. This is particularly relevant with HIV testing. This qualitative study reports the views of 29 women attending an antenatal clinic in a large maternity hospital in Scotland where a trial of different ways of offering HIV testing on a universal, voluntary basis occurred. Women were in favour of a test offer, although they did not necessarily wish to accept testing for themselves. Generally they were more worried about having an unhealthy baby. There was a commonly held view that routine testing would cause less anxiety because it would eliminate the stigma of saying yes to testing. A move towards the HIV test being recommended to pregnant women as opposed to merely offered is likely to be acceptable, would probably increase uptake rates and should therefore be assessed.

Type:Article
Title:What do pregnant women think about the HIV test? A qualitative study
DOI:10.1080/09540129948171
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health

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