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The SNARC effect: an instance of the Simon effect?

Mapelli, D; Rusconi, E; Umiltà, C; (2003) The SNARC effect: an instance of the Simon effect? Cognition , 88 (3) B1 - 10.

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Abstract

Our aim was to investigate the relations between the Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) effect and the Simon effect. In Experiment 1 participants were required to make a parity judgment to numbers from 1 to 9 (without 5), by pressing a left or a right key. The numbers were presented to either the left or right side of fixation. Results showed the Simon effect (left-side stimuli were responded to faster with the left hand than with the right hand whereas right-side stimuli were responded to faster with the right hand), and the SNARC effect (smaller numbers were responded to faster with the left hand than with the right hand, whereas larger numbers were responded to faster with the right hand). No interaction was found between the Simon and SNARC effects, suggesting that they combine additively. In Experiment 2 the temporal distance between formation of the task-relevant non-spatial stimulus code and the task-irrelevant stimulus spatial code was increased. As in Experiment 1, results showed the presence of the Simon and SNARC effects but no interaction between them. Moreover, we found a regular Simon effect for faster RTs, and a reversed Simon effect for longer RTs. In contrast, the SNARC effect did not vary as a function of RT. Taken together, the results of the two experiments show that the SNARC effect does not simply constitute a variant of the Simon effect. This is considered to be evidence that number representation and space representation rest on different neural (likely parietal) circuits.

Type:Article
Title:The SNARC effect: an instance of the Simon effect?
Location:Netherlands
Language:English
Keywords:Adult, Attention, Cognition, Female, Functional Laterality, Humans, Male, Models, Theoretical, Reaction Time, Space Perception, Visual Perception
UCL classification:UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Security and Crime Science

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