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Cataracts after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission: a study of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

Belkacemi, Y; Labopin, M; Vernant, JP; Prentice, HG; Tichelli, A; Schattenberg, A; Boogaerts, MA; ... Gorin, NC; + view all (1998) Cataracts after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission: a study of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics , 41 (3) pp. 659-668.

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Type: Article
Title: Cataracts after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission: a study of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Additional information: 98297640 PURPOSE: Advances in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) have consistently improved long-term survival. Therefore, evaluation of late complications such as cataracts is of paramount importance. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed data of 2149 patients from the EBMT registry. A cohort of 1063 patients were evaluable for survival and ophthalmologic status after transplant for acute leukemia (AL) in first or second complete remission. Conditioning therapy included either single-dose total body irradiation (STBI) or fractionated TBI (FTBI) grouped in different dose rates (low: LDR 0.04 Gy/min). RESULTS: The overall 10-year estimated cataract incidence (ECI) was 50%. It was 60% in the STBI group, 43% in the FTBI group 6 fractions (p 23 years), higher dose rate (> 0.04 Gy/min), allogeneic BMT, and steroid administration (> 100 days). The use of FTBI was associated with a decreased risk of cataract. Heparin administration was a protective factor in patients receiving STBI. In terms of cataract surgery, the unfavorable factors for requiring surgery were: age > 23 yr, STBI, dose rate > 0.04 Gy/min, chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGvHD), and absence of heparin administration. Among the patients who required cataract surgery (111 out of 257), secondary posterior capsular opacification was observed in 15.7%. CONCLUSION: High dose rate and STBI are the main risk factors for cataract development and the need for surgery, and the administration of heparin has a protective role in cataractogenesis
Keywords: Administration, Adolescence, Adult, age factors, ALS, Analysis of Variance, bone, BONE MARROW, BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION, Bone Marrow Transplantation/Xadverse effects, Cataract Extraction, Cataract/Xetiology, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort, Complications, development, disease, evaluation, Factors, Female, Incidence, Infant, male, middle age, Patient, patients, rate, Registries, Retrospective studies, Risk, risk factors, surgery, Survival, therapy, Time Factors, transplantation, Transplantation Conditioning/Xadverse effects, Whole-Body Irradiation/Xadverse effects
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Haematology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/33574
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