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The inclusive city: delivering a more accessible urban environment through inclusive design

Hanson, J; (2004) The inclusive city: delivering a more accessible urban environment through inclusive design. In: (Proceedings) RICS Cobra 2004 International Construction Conference: responding to change. : York, UK. Green open access

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Abstract

This paper examines the reasons why the design of urban public space in the UK has failed to provide easy access to the city centre for older people and people with disabilities. After tracing the impact of medical, social, and bio-social models of disability on professional attitudes and values, the account goes on to consider ?architectural disability? that is produced by the design of the built environment. The distinctions between general needs, special needs and inclusive design are examined, and the impact of these different approaches is considered in respect of built environment legislation and architectural practice. Access to the city centre is conceptualised in terms of the ?transport chain? and public toilets are identified as a missing link in that chain. The provision of accessible ?away from home? toilets in city centres is examined as a worked example of the tension that currently exists between designing for special needs and inclusive design. The paper concludes by speculating about the part that chartered surveyors could play in implementing a more inclusive approach to design. This paper examines the reasons why the design of urban public space in the UK has failed to provide easy access to the city centre for older people and people with disabilities. After tracing the impact of medical, social, and bio-social models of disability on professional attitudes and values, the account goes on to consider ?architectural disability? that is produced by the design of the built environment. The distinctions between general needs, special needs and inclusive design are examined, and the impact of these different approaches is considered in respect of built environment legislation and architectural practice. Access to the city centre is conceptualised in terms of the ?transport chain? and public toilets are identified as a missing link in that chain. The provision of accessible ?away from home? toilets in city centres is examined as a worked example of the tension that currently exists between designing for special needs and inclusive design. The paper concludes by speculating about the part that chartered surveyors could play in implementing a more inclusive approach to design.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: The inclusive city: delivering a more accessible urban environment through inclusive design
Event: RICS Cobra 2004 International Construction Conference: responding to change
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Additional information: Imported via OAI, 7:29:01 16th May 2007
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/3351
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